Galerie Jeannine Blais
Magazin'Art

Winter 2014

La Côte du Maine, acrylique, 12 x 16 po, 2013,

Louise Calvé

When Painting is as Natural as Eating and Drinking

Great Encounter

I must confess: I fell deeply in love with the work as with the woman, the two being inherently linked. Louise Calvé has been part of Québec’s visual arts scene since the 1960s.

The distinctive artistic trajectory she has chosen warrants that we stop and take note, especially to underline the character traits of an artist that has been able to evolve rapidly between figuration and abstraction, the latter omnipresent, almost required, under the influence of the ‘Refus Global ’ movement. “Artistic expression requires total freedom, ” explains the artist. Having spent time in Paris, she unhesitatingly states that this is where a decisive turning point occurred for her.

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Text by Michel Bois

I must confess: I fell deeply in love with the work as with the woman, the two being inherently linked. Louise Calvé has been part of…

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Réflection automnale, 24 x 30 po, 2012

Claude Langevin

The Golden Era

Painting a Country

At the time, children followed in their parents’ footsteps,” reminisces Claude Langevin. Like many others, he started his professional career on this principle. Then, with audacity and perseverance, he branched off onto his own path, something few people ever did.

Son of a medical doctor and one of five siblings, Claude Langevin began studying medicine, engaged on a path set by his father and already followed by his eldest brother. “I studied medicine for a year and soon came to understand that it wasn’t a career for me. I had been painting since the age of 14, and that was what I loved doing. The news was difficult to accept for my family.” To discard such a secure career option for one that was perceived as marginal seemed like pure folly. But we were in the early 60s, when a wind of freedom and change had started to sweep Québec. Claude Langevin, then known under his real name of Paul Viens, was about to embark on this wave of artistic renewal that celebrated local talent.

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Text by Isabelle Gauthier 

 

“At the time, children followed in their parents’ footsteps,” reminisces Claude Langevin. Like many others, he started…

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Entre ciel et mer, 24 x 40 po, 2013

Suzanne Lavigne

A World of Beauty and Inner Peace

Delight in discovery

Since she started painting, Suzanne Lavigne has been fascinated with the fantastic discoveries the medium constantly provides.

The whole process, for her, is a profound experience where she abandons herself to her creative inspiration. The demands of everyday life simply fade away while her artistic sensitivity takes hold of her being. She becomes a spectator, aware of the nascent canvas taking shape under her eyes. Through her spontaneity of gesture, distinctive of abstracts impressionists, emerges a dialogue between the tools of the trade, the canvas supports and the acrylic pigments. Results often exceed her expectations as the freshly painted canvas reflects her inner spirit and deepest feelings.

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 Text by Helene Caroline Fournier

 

Since she started painting, Suzanne Lavigne has been fascinated with the fantastic discoveries the medium constantly provides…

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Dreamscape (Ancestor series), conté, 58,5 x 39 po, 1975

Soul Catcher

The Art of John Gould

The art of drawing

Great art has great presence. It has visual impact. It draws you to the work and holds your attention, partly because of the artist’s style, partly because of his or her subject matter.

Canadian artist John Gould (1929-2010) is recognized mostly for his consistently high quality, mesmerizing drawings, a medium he favored. “Painting and sculpture are slow and maddeningly indirect,” he writes, in John Gould Journals , 1996. “Art materials in all their bulky complexity have a way of overwhelming the work. All that labor is honorable, but it slows you down. That’s why I’ve spent my life drawing; it’s finally just me and the paper. To pull a line across the page is to feel a quickening of brain and muscle. To draw is to join real time.”

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Text by John Norris

Photos are courtesy of the Roberts Gallery

 

Great art has great presence. It has visual impact. It draws you to the work and holds your attention, partly because of the artist’s style…

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Visage rose, albâtre

Chantal Gauvreau

Of Stone and Light

Form, volume and space

Established in Weedon, Eastern Townships, sculptor Chantal Gauvreau is without a doubt one of the most reputed artists of the Montérégie region and beyond, also known for her generous and enthusiastic personality.

Born in the Gaspésie region in a theatre loving family, she is passionate about travelling and reading. It is therefore without regret – we might even say without surprise – that she disregards her diploma in Economic science obtained from the University of Sherbrooke to initially turn towards jewellery design in order to give free reign to her creativity. Then she discovers the works of Patricio Rivera, Chilean sculptor and musician, who was forced to flee his country’s military dictatorship during the 70s. He established himself in Sherbrooke, Québec, where he created copper murals inspired from African primitive art. That’s when Chantal Gauvreau reorients her own artistic path towards metal sculpture. She quickly achieves success and, in 1990, receives the Eastern Townships Grand Award in Arts and crafts and becomes a member of the Sculptors Association of Montérégie.

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Text by Catherine Guex

 

Established in Weedon, Eastern Townships, sculptor Chantal Gauvreau is without a doubt one of the most reputed artists…

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LATULIPPE ANDRE_MAGAZINART

André Latulippe

City Lights

Studio visite

 Old Québec has clothed its white coat and muffled up its buildings in soft silvery cotton. The snow and intense cold further mellow its tender somnolence in nonchalant calmness. A city of fleeting amorous adventures all breathing in unison the sweet fragrance of idyllic sentiments! – André Latulippe

The artist would have been a poet or an author, had painting not cast its spell over him. Bewitched by the City of Québec, the painter deems himself a populist. Born in 1940, in the working-class district of Saint- Sauveur, André Latulippe depicts anonymous figures evolving among the architectural anthology of the first French speaking city in North-America. In solidarity with those of most humble human condition within the realm of historical dimension, his work bears witness to the determination of a man shining an antique jewel until it sparkles.

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Text by Michel Bois

 

 

Old Québec has clothed its white coat and muffled up its buildings in soft silvery cotton. The snow and intense cold further mellow…

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Magazinart news

MONTREAL

There is something just a little special on at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts this winter season. Splendore A Venezia Art and Music from the Renaissance to Baroque in the Serenissima will be running until January 19, 2014. As you might imagine this is a mixed media exhibition or as cultural cognoscenti might say an innovative multidisciplinary exhibition focusing the eye and the ear on the Venetian Republic in its heyday.

The exhibition spans time from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries and consists on the visual side of 120 works of art, paintings, prints and drawings by the likes of Titian, Tintoretto, Bassano, Giovani Battista, Tiepolo and Canaletto among others as well as period musical instruments. And as for the musical side of the brain, a free audioguide is available that will play music by the likes of Vivaldi or Albinoni that directly relate to either the painting or musical instrument being looked at. As well, as series of matching concerts has been arranged for the museum’s Salle Bourgie.

Winter 2014

There is something just a little special on at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts this winter season…

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Magazinart news

TORONTO

Until June 2014, the Art Gallery of Ontario is running Kenojuak Ashevak: In Memoriam. Ashevak was born in 1927 in an igloo on Baffin Island and died in early January 2013 at home on Cape Dorset at the age of 85, and with her passed an era. She was probably one of the last people alive to have been persuaded by James Houston to abandon traditional crafts to making prints. Houston was the man who put Inuit art on the map, an artist himself, he was painting in the north when he started swapping his work for theirs. The sculpture he brought south with him was impressive enough for the government to send him back up to teach the Inuit how to make prints and so art began to blossom in the north as a way to replace income lost from the fading fur trade.

Editor and publisher Douglas Gibson who knew both Ashevak and Houston described Ashevak as Houston’s star pupil.

She was almost the face of Inuit art for a time. Her print, The Enchanted Owl, 1960, became a Canada Post stamp in 1970, the same year she travelled to the World’s Fair in Osaka. In 1967 she was made a member of the Order of Canada and in 1982 she was made a Companion of the Order of Canada. The Osaka World’s Fair provided her with an international reputation.

Winter 2014

Until June 2014, the Art Gallery of Ontario is running Kenojuak Ashevak: In Memoriam…

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Magazinart news

QUEBEC CITY

Now winter in Quebec City is a different ball of wax entirely. For one thing you get a real winter and that’s becoming just a little difficult to arrange in these climate challenged days. Until February 16, 2014 The William S. Paley Collection: A Taste for Modernism will be showing at the Musee national des beaux-art du Québec.

Quebec City is the only Canadian stop for this touring exhibition. The exhibit consists of 62 paintings, sculptures and graphic works and covers the field from Impressionism and post Impressionism to modernism. Works by Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, Paul Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Matisse, Derain, Pablo Picasso and Francis Bacon are on display.

Winter 2014

Now winter in Quebec City is a different ball of wax entirely. For one thing you get a real winter…

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Braise des neiges, technique mixte, 60 x 36 po

Patricia Kramer

A Clever use of contrasts

Art in a feminine perspective

The creative urge has inhabited artist Patricia Kramer for as long as she can remember. After exploring a variety of avenues, she finally found a form of expression her imagination totally embraced: painting.

From fashion design to jewellery and lamp creation, the artist was never at a loss for ideas on how to further her inventive passion. She constantly endeavoured to explore new opportunities and live out her dreams, but commercial constraints hindered her need for expansion and she craved more liberty. These varied experiences gradually outlined the path she would follow, as she gained confidence in herself, until it became evident that her plan of life could only be realized through painting. Having devoted the last eighteen months exclusively to her art, this native of Holland, who holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Québec in Three-Rivers and a college diploma in fashion design from LaSalle College, is finally able to find her true persona and reach her full potential.

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Text by Lisanne Le Tellier

The creative urge has inhabited artist Patricia Kramer for as long as she can remember. After exploring a variety of avenues…

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Maison à Baie-Saint-Paul, 1946

Maurice Le Bel (1898-1963)

A Legitimate Career Path – From Earthy Reality to Abstraction

On Exhibit

An avant-garde artist is in opposition with the existing system.” – Ionesco

When you’ve reached the other shore, help others to reach it” – Bouddha

Early 20th century Québecois artists have depicted women, landscapes, scenes of daily life as well as still-life in various media such as engraving, painting and sculpture. Sometime later a few adepts of Cubism integrated a geometrical dimension, void of references, to their art. Then came the Surrealists, lead by Alfred Pellan, with their imaginary and dreamlike creations. Finally, the Abstract Automatists of the Refus Global movement, formed by Borduas, Riopelle, Ferron, Gauvreau, Barbeau and others, enjoy some renown and pave the way for the Plasticiens with Molinari as their national flag bearer. This constitutes, in short, the essence of what we today call the School of Montréal.

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Text by Michel Bois

For information, please contact Mr. Richard Foisy, exhibition curator at Letbridge Exhibition Centre in Saint-Laurent and author of the catalogue published by Fides, and/or Mrs. Céline Le Merlus, Musée des maîtres et artisans du Québec, at 514-747-7367, extension 7102. – conservationnaq.qc.ca

Early 20th century Québecois artists have depicted women, landscapes, scenes of daily life as well as…

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