Magazin'Art

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BOSTON

If you find yourself in Boston this winter and fancy the art of the renaissance you may want to consider catching Botticelli: Heroines and Heroes at the Isabella Stewart Gardiner Museum, February 14, 2019 to May 19, 2019. It will be, for one thing, probably the only time, unless you visit Italy, that you will have a chance to see Botticelli’s Story of Virginia, on loan from Italy for the first time and appearing only in Boston.

Botticelli: Heroines and Heroes consists of eight monumental works painted by Botticelli circa 1500 demonstrate the artist’s extraordinary talents as a master storyteller. Botticelli was more than adept at reinventing ancient Roman and early Christian heroines and heroes as renaissance role models transforming their stories of lust, betrayal and vi0lence into parables for a more secular time.

Thanks to loans from the British National Gallery and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the exhibition has also reunited three out of the four panels telling the tale of the early Christian saint, Zenobius.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

If you find yourself in Boston this winter…

VANCOUVER

If you happen to find yourself in Vancouver sometime before March 17, 2019 and you have a burning desire to find out how certain pieces of art come to be in a museum and others do not, then you should find you way to the Vancouver Art Gallery where A Curator’s View Ian Thom Selects is in progress.

Ian Thom was the Senior Curator at the Vancouver Art Gallery for 33 years and as such was responsible for the acquisition of hundreds of paintings. The audioguide for the exhibit allows Thom the time to explain the process behind the acquisition of paintings and artwork.

The exhibition consists of almost 90 works including paintings, drawings, photographs and sculptures. The gallery contains the world’s most significant collection of work by Emily Carr and some of those paintings will be on display as well.

The exhibition features both historical and  contemporary  work  including examples of Pop, abstraction, landscape and portraiture. Local, national and international works of art are on display by artists like Henri Beau, Emily Carr, Robert Davidson, Gathie Falk, Leon Golub, David Hockney, Ann Kipling, Beatrice Lennie, David Milne, Paul Peel, George Segal, Graham Sutherland, Andy Warhol, John Vanderpant and Zacherie Vincent among others.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

If you happen to find yourself in Vancouver…

CALGARY

If you happen to be in Calgary and want to see the work of a rising Canadian art star and all around agent provacateur you could do no matter than catch the next installment of Kent Monkman’s alter ego Little Miss Chief Testickle.

The Glenbow Museum in Calgary is running Kent Monkman: The Rise and Fall of Civilization starting on February 3, 2019. The work in question is a room filling installation that shows Miss Chief Eagle Tetickle standing on top of a nine foot high replica of a rock-face buffalo jump as sculptural buffalo run through the gallery.

This show should be seen because come on, let’s face it. When was the last time you saw buffalo roaming through a museum. The buffalo jump stands for the sustainable approach to living practised by the First Nations which is implicitly compared to the slaughter of the buffalo as an act of genocide against the indigenous inhabitants, depriving them of the means to feed themselves to open up the land to settlers. Monkman is a painter, performance artist and film maker whose works have appeared in numerous international venues and has been collected by major museum across Canada.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

If you happen to be in Calgary and want to…

TORONTO

A new take on Impressionism is taking to the exhibition halls as the Art Gallery of Ontario presents Impressionism in the Age of Industry: Monet Pissarro and More from February 16, 2019 to May 5, 2019.

Developed and mounted by the AGO, the show is the first retrospective to look at the work of some of the world’s greatest Impressionist  and Post-Impressionist painters through the lens of labour and industry. Impressionism is usually associated with leisure activities and this is the first time that the movement is seen as also celebrating the changes that were taking place in Paris as the city went through industrialization and its painters celebrated the dawn of a new era.

The exhibition showcases more than a hundred  works  including  paintings, sculptures, drawings prints, photographs and films from the era. The show begins circa 1870 and ends with the turn of the century. Art work for the exhibition has been sourced f rom around the globe including key works by Monet from the Musee d’Orsay and the Art Institute of Chicago. Works on display include Camille Pissarro’s Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Damp Weather, Claude Monet’s Charring Cross Bridge, Fog, Edgar Degas’ Woman at her Bath, and James Tissot’s The Shop Girl.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

A new take on Impressionism is taking to…

OTTAWA

Paul Klee enthusiasts should take note because Paul Klee: The Berggruen Collection from the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be running at the National Gallery from November 16, 2018 to March 17, 2019.

It is the first Canadian show dedicated to Klee in nearly forty years. The exhibition is made up of 75 drawings, watercolours and oils and range from his student days in the 1890s to his death in 1940.

Klee is now one of the world’s most popular artists. Although he was often associated with Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism and Abstraction his works are difficult to classify because he largely worked in isolation, putting his own stamp  on  each  idea  that  he  became interested in.

He worked in a variety of mediums. Along with his drawings, watercolours and paintings he also worked in ink, pastel, etching and more. Often he combined media. The materials he used included canvas, burlap, linen, gauze, cardboard, metal foils, fabric, wallpaper and newsprint. Klee was a mixed media king combining oil and watercolour, watercolour with pen and India ink and oil with tempera. He also used  spray  paint,  knife  application, stamping, glazing and impasto.

He often felt challenged by colour and spent long periods studying it until he became a master colourist.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

Paul Klee enthusiasts should take note because…

MONTREAL

It may be a little late to mention this one, but if you can you really should visit the Montreal Museum of Contemporary Art and see Julian Rosefeldt’s Manifesto which sadly only runs until January 20, 2019. I say sadly because Manifesto appears to be everything that modern art can and should be. It is  bold, it blurs lines and it has a lot to say. The exhibition is somewhere between the lines made up of film, performance and installation art.

It questions the nature of art and it deals with modern alienation. But most of all it questions. In form the show is made up of 13 channel immersive video installa- tion and features Australian actress Cate Blanchett playing a variety of roles ranging f rom  school  teacher,  factory  worker, homeless man, puppeteer and scientist, among others.

The monologues Blanchett performs, indeed, all the spoken words come from various artists’ manifestos written over the last 150 years. Manifesto draws on manifestos written by Futurists, Dadaists, Fluxus, Suprematists, Situationists and Dogme 95. The words of Claes Oldenberg, Yvonne Rainer, Kazimir Malevitch, Andre Breton, Elaine Sturtevant and Jim Jarmusch are also used.

While Manifesto has toured around the world this is only the second time it can be seen in North America.

Winter 2019

18 December 2018

It may be a little late to mention this one…

Louise Lecorre-Kirouac

(1939-2018)

Tribute

We sadly learned of the passing, on October 27, of painter Louise Lecorre-Kirouac, sister of illustrious artist the late Tex Lecor. In 1973, she started painting portraits and exhibiting them. She also dabbled in photography, unaware of what her talent had in store for her. Others may have been reluctant to admit being a sibling of Tex Lecor, one of Québec’s most prominent visual artists, but she readily boasted of being his sister, as we were able to read in the 1989 summer issue of your Magazin’Art in an article written by Bernard Théoret. “Indeed, we owe Tex a debt of gratitude for having incited her to abandon photography, for having shared his knowledge with her, dragging her with him across Québec, and encouraging her to impart her vision. Louise Kirouac is today ‘one the Tex’s band’ and, a few times a year she accompanies him, Claude Langevin, Umberto Bruni and others on scenery escapades to the four corners of Québec…,” then penned Théoret. They formed a movement of landscape artists animated with the same passion for painting to generously share with us the beauty as seen through their eyes smitten with love and freedom, which tends to slowly disappear. An artistic career may bear some hardships, but so does life. To the immediate family, we wish to express our deepest and most sincere condolences.

The editors of Magazin’Art

Winter 2019

17 December 2018

We sadly learned of the passing, on October 27…

LONDON, ENGLAND

If you happen to find yourself in London this Fall and if you have a romantic inclination you could do no better than going to the Tate Britain to attend the Edward Burne-Jones exhibition running from 24 October until 24 February 2019. Made up of more than 150 works including stained glass and tapestry, many designed for his friend and fellow social reformer William Morris, as well as portraits, gifts he made for family and friends, and a piano painted inside and out with scenes from the story of Orpheus and Eurydice, the centrepiece will be some of his most ambitious projects, the Briar Rose and Perseus cycles of paintings.

The Briar Rose paintings – each almost 3 metres long, illustrating the fairytale with the artist’s daughter, Margaret, as Sleeping Beauty – are still in the house for which they were bought in 1890. For the first time they are being loaned with the decorative panels Burne-Jones created to link the paintings on the walls of the Georgian saloon.

The client for the Perseus cycle had a harder time: the 26-year-old MP and future prime minister Arthur Balfour was required to block up windows and change doors to make room for a 10-painting telling of the Greek hero Perseus’s rescue of Andromeda. This exhibition marks the first time that the two cycles of paintings will be exhibited together.

Burne-Jones was a charter member of the Pre-Raphaelites a society determined to restore what they saw as the best art. Although  Burne-Jones’s dreamy-eyed maidens and muscular heroes in melancholy romantic settings became some of the best-loved paintings in British art and influenced generations of artists including Pablo Picasso, this will be the first large exhibition in London in decades and the first at the Tate since 1933, the centenary of his birth. Many loans are from private  collectors, including the Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page.

 

Fall 2018

19 September 2018

If you happen to find yourself in London…

CALGARY

The Glenbow Museum in Calgary is hosting what could turn out to be a fascinating series of exhibitions, The Artist’s Mirror: Self Portraits, running until January 6, 2019. The show is being mounted in partnership with Library and Archives Canada. This first edition will be followed up by more of the same. In this exhibition, featuring self-portraits from the collections of Library and Archives Canada and Glenbow, the legacy of the artist’s mirror lives on. Here artists are looking deeply at themselves, a practice reflected across a wide variety of media, artistic styles and time periods. From biographical self- expression to political commentary, the motivation behind creating a self-portrait is as diverse as the artists themselves.

As part of a five-year collaboration with Library and Archives Canada, Glenbow will host a series of exhibitions drawn from this national portrait collection. The inaugural exhibition features fascinating works by Emily Carr, Norval Morriseau, Yousuf Karsh, Alma Duncan and many others.

 

Fall 2018

19 September 2018

The Glenbow Museum in Calgary is hosting…

TORONTO

Going from the sublime to the tragic it may be time, as the world seems in danger of facing a major conflict, to revisit what war actually means and in that case the Art Gallery of Ontario is the place to be as they are hosting a mammoth exhibition, Photography: The First World War-1914-1918. The AGO holds 500 photographic albums depicting the First World War from all sides and because of the amount of material available divided it up in two like this. Part I: April 28 – October 28, 2018. Part II: November 10, 2018 – April 14, 2019.

Adjacent to the main display, the McEwen Gallery will showcase works by Australian war photographer James Francis “Frank” Hurley (1885–1962), who was on official assignment throughout World War I. His album Australian Units on the Western Front (1916–1918) presents a series of compelling photographs, each offering views of different aspects of life on the Front. Soldiers, in action and at ease, are pictured, as well as the grimmer realities of war: casualties, scorched landscapes, and destroyed  architecture.  The  album — disassembled for the exhibition — highlights Hurley’s skill as a photographer and features a rich breadth of imagery.

 

Fall 2018

19 September 2018

Going from the sublime to the tragic it may be time…

MONTREAL

Continuing right along with modernism The Montreal Museum of Fine Art is running: Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor, running from September 22, 2018 until February 23, 2019.

No matter which way you cut it Calder was an important artist. Montreal has a piece of his art, Les Trois disques, on St. Helene’s Island in the Parc Jean Drapeau that was given to the city after Expo 67. The sculpture consists of five overlapping stainless steel discs that have an arachnoid cast to them. It stands 22 metres, the second highest stabile Calder created. Trained as an engineer Calder created his first sculpture at the age of eleven.

During the 1920s, Alexander Calder developed his art among the artistic and intellectual circles of the day, mingling in Paris with the international avant-garde including figures such as Cocteau, Duchamp, Le Corbusier, Léger, Mondrian, Miró, Prévert and Varèse.

While you may not be familiar with Calder’s work you are probably familiar with the mobiles that are used as educational toys that hang over children’s cribs. No less a person than Marcel Duchamp named Calder’s kinetic sculptures Mobiles. While Jean Arp described his stationary sculptures as Stabiles. The exhibition consists of over a hundred works will be shown in Calder’s first Canadian retrospective. Calder is known as the man who set art in motion.

 

Fall 2018

19 September 2018

Continuing right along with modernism…

QUEBEC CITY

One of the nice things about Quebec City is that you never need a reason to go. Just the fact that its architecture and food exists is a good reason to visit.

The Musée des beaux-arts national du Quebec has mounted what looks like another excellent exhibition on one of Quebec’s pivotal artists, Marcel Barbeau In Movement, runs from October 11, 2018 until January 6, 2019.

A  notable figure in contemporary Canadian art, Marcel Barbeau produced an impressive body of more than 4,000 works spanning  seven  decades. Intersecting several significant periods in the history of recent art, his output provides an overview as singular as it is insightful.

Barbeau was at the forefront of numerous avant-garde movements and artistic trends in Canada. He was a leading contributor to the first stirrings of Abstract painting was renowned internationally for his contribution to OpArt.

The Quebec show is the most ambitious retrospective on the artist to date. Works on display are from his entire career, from the 1940s to 2015.

 

Fall 2018

19 September 2018

One of the nice things about Quebec City…