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Magazin'Art
  • Visual arts

    post confinement

     

    The stay at home requirement has heavily affected the creative community and art galleries at a time when everyone is in dire need of comforting, of liberating images and wonderment. Medically speaking, art is powerless against Coronavirus. However, throughout the ages humanity has shown us that art has acted as balm or bandage to relieve the anxieties of tormented souls. Nonetheless, let’s stand together and mobilize our talents to help propel visual arts beyond this universal downturn. As it happens, an increasing number of gallery owners believe that collectors will henceforth connect with art digitally. Absolute nonsense… Admittedly, gallery patrons may seek information via this cold and pragmatic technology, but images on a screen will never convey the indescribably moving experience provided by the sensual presence of the artwork. Nor will it impart the emotionally charged atmosphere of a vernissage in presence of the artist. Even less will the minimalist description concocted, or worse, a tweet of maximum 140 characters. Indisputably the survival of art galleries has been compromised by this health crisis, but the pre-pandemic facts remain: the ruthless and often exorbitant rental costs, without even one sale. Is it normal to pay $6,000.00 a month for a storefront location? I certainly don’t think so.

    On this day, May 4th, art galleries in Québec City, Charlevoix and other regions are back on the playing field. But, at the time of writing these lines, I am unaware of the prevailing situation in Montréal, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. Still dismal, most probably! On that, I wish the very best outcome for all within the shortest delays. For artists, gallerists and collectors simply cannot exist without one another. May I also express a wish for the emergence of new open-minded talents, similarly to that crucial moment at the end of the First World War when Surrealism was born! Indeed, exasperated with realistic scenes of the sick, the dying, and of ruins, artists began dreaming of painting the world in a different light, with a desire to emotionally and intellectually inhabit a less unstable universe. Thus art reclaimed its true and legitimate destiny. What will the situation be like after quarantine? What would you like to see? An unprecedented amount of masterpieces expressing personal and soulful visions? Clearly, your Magazin’Art will be here to inform you. Glossy paper. Insightful and thorough texts. Witness to live art for over thirty-two years. With more than 700 drop points across Canada and the United States.

    Thank you for commenting. We will publish.

     

     

    Michel Bois

     


     

    To read the full article …

    Buy our fabulous Summer 2020 issue in digital PDF or paper format! 

     

     

    The stay at home requirement has heavily affected the creative…

  • Great Encounter :

    Carlo Cosentino – Sign of the Times

     

    Carlo Cosentino seeks a sense of wonder in the mundane. A laneway, a chair, a school bus passing-by, all sparkle under his brush as a cut-out of reality sublimated by light. An outdoor terrace deserted under the threat of a virus… on our cover page: I love it!

    To capture a city’s atmosphere, its pulse, an artist must perceive its multiple subtleties: the colouring of light, the shimmer of hues, and the softness of secondary lighting, without forgetting the bustle of the city. Carlo Cosentino has been on the lookout for these daily nuances for the last 40 years. Self-taught painter and sculptor, luminosity is the distinguishing feature of his body of work. His precise tracing stages realistic scenes, almost photographic in terms of perspective, the whole draped with the luminosity of varied atmospheres. The table is set!

     

     

    Mostly inspired by the seasons, Carlo Cosentino seeks a sense of wonder in the mundane. A laneway, a chair, a school bus passing by, all sparkle under his brush as a cut-out of reality sublimated by light. By selecting an unusual angle, the image tells a story, which is the aim of the artist. “The observer must be able to penetrate the scene,” which is facilitated by the familiar urban scenes that he paints. During the year 2019, his preferred subjects were cityscapes, but challenges may differ overtime. “The year before, I worked on reflections, on the presence of water and its diluted aspect.” Passionate and proactive, he nourishes his passion by working constantly, seeking out scenes with narrative potential. Even our Québec winters, which at times seem endless, do not keep him inside. Thus may he be found sitting on a park bench, in a wooded area or capturing the movements of skaters behind his residence.

     


    Huile sur toile de coton


    Rue Sherbrooke coin St-Denis, Montréal, huile sur toile de coton, 30 × 40 po

     

    Born in Montréal in 1958, the second boy of five siblings, his father, having studied Fine Arts, will influence him artistically. Cosentino recalls how fascinated he was as a youngster watching his father at work. Subjugated, fascinated, he already sensed he would have a future in the arts.

     


    Huile sur toile de coton


    Saveurs d’Italie, huile sur toile de coton, 30 × 24 po

     

     

    Isabelle Gauthier

     


     

    To read the full article …

    Buy our fabulous Summer 2020 issue in digital PDF or paper format! 

     

     

    To capture a city’s atmosphere, its pulse, an artist must perceive…

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