Magazin'Art

Vancouver

VANCOUVER

Emily Carr: Into the Forest opens on May 13th and runs until March 4th, 2018 at the Vancouver Art Gallery. As you would image the exhibition’s subject matter is the West Coast forest and Carr’s relationship with it, as shown in 45 paintings. The gallery’s Senior Curator-Historical, Ian M. Thom says that, “by confronting the forest directly, Carr celebrated the natural world through her masterful images of the coastal forest landscape. Through her unique synthesis of the spiritual and natural, Carr’s forest paintings have shaped the way British Columbians perceive their natural surroundings.”

In 1935 Carr wrote: “Sketching in the big woods is wonderful. You go, find a space wide enough to sit in and clear enough so that the undergrowth is not drowning you. Everything is green. Everything is waiting and still. Slowly things begin to move, to slip in their places. Groups and masses and lines tie themselves together. Colours you had not noticed come out timidly or boldly… Here is a picture, a complete thought and there another and there…”

Summer 2017

Emily Carr: Into the Forest opens on May 13th and runs until March 4th, 2018 at the Vancouver Art Gallery…

VANCOUVER

The Vancouver Art Gallery has a splendid history when it comes to supporting pho- tography as an artistic medium and this Fall they continue that tradition with Walker Evans: Depth of Field, running from October 29, 2016 to January 22, 2017.

Evans, who lived from 1903 to 1975 is one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. His photographs of the deep south during the depression were a significant contribution to the development of what is now called documentary photography. The show is made up of some 180 black and white and colour photographs.

Fall 2016

The Vancouver Art Gallery has a splendid history when it comes to supporting pho- tography as an artistic medium and this Fall they continue that tradition with Walker Evans…

VANCOUVER

Something wonderful has happened at the Vancouver Art Gallery. It is the beneficiary of a trove of Northwest Coast Art donated by the estate of the late San Francisco collector George Gund III. One of the First Nations art works dates back to 700 AD. The collection is made up of 20 historical works by Haida, Heiltsuk, Inuit, Kwakwaka’wakw, Nuu-chah-nulth, Nuxalk and Tinglit artists and 17 modern pieces including two more or less recently carved totem poles, drawings by Bill Reid and 13 carved works by Robert Davidson.

When joined to the museum’s existing collection of Davidson’s work the new pieces mean that the Vancouver Art Gallery now has the most significant Davidson collection in a museum. The Gund Collection is on exhibition until January 31, 2016 .

Last but not least VAG is exhibiting what appears to be a blockbuster show on Canadian landscape painting from 1840-1940, Embracing Canada: Landscapes from Kreighoff to the Group of Seven . Once again this is a run don’t walk scenario because the exhibition which features some 130 works finishes on January 24th . All the usual suspects are present when it comes to realistic painting.

Winter 2016

Something wonderful has happened at the Vancouver Art Gallery. It is the beneficiary of a trove of Northwest Coast Art donated by the estate of the late San Francisco collector George Gund III…

Pauline Paquin

Living in a Children’s World

On Exhibit 

One day, as children ran out of school, an aspiring artist happened to notice them. Their joy, their lightness of being, their carefree attitude captured her attention and this expression of pure joy became her leitmotiv. 

Pauline Paquin‘s canvases are filled with childhood moments of daily life. Her colourful scenes, with their lot of naivety, are pleasing for the eyes and inevitably generate smiles. “Children colour my life,” says the artist whose career spans three decades. It is the essence of the artist to marvel at mere details that are generally overlooked by the masses. She channels her inspiration onto the canvas, highlighting and sealing her final vision in full colours.  Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more


By Isabelle Gauthier

 

Pauline Paquin is represented by:  

 Galerie Pauline T. Paquin, St-Sauveur
Galerie Le Balcon d’Art, Saint-Lambert
Galerie 2000, Montréal
Chase Art Gallery, Beaconsfield
Galerie 88, Vancouver, à Artym, Vancouver
Galerie La Pinsonnière, La Malbaie

Pauline Paquin’s canvases are filled with childhood moments of daily life. Her colourful scenes, with their lot of naivety, are…

OTTAWA

There’s no place like Ottawa in the spring, especially if the tulips are out. If you need a reason to visit, The Charles Edenshaw exhibition that wowed Vancouver has picked up stakes and moved to the National Gallery of Canada and will be showing from March 7 to May 25, 2014.

Edenshaw lived from 1829 to 1920. He was descended from a long line of Haida carvers and in turn his descendents, ran- ging from Bill Reid to James Hart, are among the most distinguished Haida carvers of their day. He worked with wood, silver, argillite and painted the hats his wife wove.

He combined traditional Haida design with an innovative and elegant personal style that helped raise Northwest Coast art to new heights. The exhibition consists of more than 80 works that have been bor- rowed from public and private collections across North America.

Haida art is one of the most powerful art forms that this country has ever given birth to. If you are at all interested in design this exhibition is a must see.

Also on at the NGC’s Rideau Chapel is Janet Cardiff: 40-Part Motet. The sound sculpture is a reworking of Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis a 16th-century English composer in which 40 individually recorded choir voices are played through 40 speakers positioned around the chapel. The only way I can imagine this is as if you were standing or sitting in an audience and the performers were placed throughout the crowd.

There’s no place like Ottawa in the spring, especially if the tulips are out. If you need a reason to visit, The…

VANCOUVER

Our Canadian heritage or patrimony section wraps up in Vancouver where at the Vancouver Art Gallery the first major solo retrospective in more than 50 years on Lauren Harris: Canadian Visionary which will open on March 1, 2013 and close on May 4, 2014.

The show features 137 paintings, oil sketches and drawings and offers a rare and extensive overview of the artist’s evolution, one of the most prominent figures in the history of Canadian art as he travels from representational to abstract. Harris was one of the driving forces behind

 

Spring 2014

Our Canadian heritage or patrimony section wraps up in Vancouver where at the Vancouver Art Gallery the first major solo…