Magazin'Art

Albert Rousseau

Musique au menu, 24 x 36 in

Colourful Vibrations

François Faucher

Great Encounters

With their chromatic intensity and figurative spatial organisation, François Faucher’s paintings are permeated with soaring lyricism. His exceptional body of work, resolutely lively, appears to be dancing to its own musical score. The artist has invented a unique technique which incorporates a vibrational effect to the painted elements that approximates musical art. The resulting overall ambience is one of movement and vibrant warmth. Behold an artist who is celebrating forty years of artistic creation.

Born in Thetford Mines, in 1959, François Faucher has always loved to draw. As a youngster he is gifted with a starter painting set which sets him on the path of creation. From the age of 16, he exhibits his works annually. But, despite his growing interest, he is not yet considering a professional artistic career. He rather chooses architecture, which he practices on the lower north-shore for six years. Then, while one day listening to Claude Dubois’ melancholic rendering of the “Blues du businessman”, he experiences a burst of passion for the arts and, at 40 years old, he quits his practice to pursue his artistic career. Never having stopped painting, François Faucher is a self-taught artist who has participated in Albert Rousseau’s famous open workshops and is inspired by Iacurto, Le Sauteur, Picasso and Van Gogh.  Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more


Text by Isabelle Gauthier

Canadian Galleries: Symbole Art (Montréal), Jutras Art Gallery (Toronto).

With their chromatic intensity and figurative spatial organisation, François Faucher’s paintings are permeated with soaring lyricism…

René Gagnon

In Harmony with Nature

Painting a Country

“I do not know whether my paintings are Surrealist or not, but I do know that they are the most honest expression of myself.” Frida Kahlo

Facing me, the man stands straight as an oak tree. His hands are huge. His hair is shaggy, much as Albert Einstein’s. His deep intense eyes reflect the greatest joys as well as the torments of human experience. René Gagnon has been dealing with the hazards of life for all of his 86 years, including 67 years with the demons of creation.

Over the restaurant table, he is showing me the pictures that are included in his book. Here, on a fishing trip with Riopelle, Paul Rebeyrolle and Stanley Cosgrove; another, with Alfred Pellan, taken during an exhibition in Paris. Being cognizant of René Gagnon’s creation is, to me, one of life’s blessings. Could it be one of the best kept secret of Québec art history?

Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more

 Texte de Michel Bois

Facing me, the man stands straight as an oak tree. His hands are huge. His hair is shaggy, much as Albert Einstein’s…

Shokichi Sato

When Forms are Shaped through Sentiment

Forms, Volume and Space

“We must content ourselves to discover and never try to explain.” Georges Braque.

Bronze is a traditional material of ancient heritage. It is a preferred medium of sculptors due to the feasibility of juxtaposing in one élan sparkling smooth surfaces and textured details of minute finesse. This being said, the present day volition to produce artworks in bronze is interesting as it testifies to how perfectly this material can be adapted to contemporary expressions.

Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more

Texte by Michel Bois

Shokichi Sato is represented by : Galerie Jean-Pierre Valentin, Montréal ; Galerie Michel-Ange, Montréal ; Galerie Yvon Desgagnés, Baie-Saint-Paul ; Galerie Dimension Plus, Montréal ; Galerie d’art du Mont-Ste-Anne, Beaupré

 

Bronze is a traditional material of ancient heritage. It is a preferred medium of sculptors due to the feasibility of juxtaposing in one élan sparkling smooth…

La Corniche Gallery

Gallery Portrait

Chicoutimi is truly magnificent! Its heritage buildings, its picturesque homes and the majestic Saguenay River, make of it a most enjoyable place to stay. It’s in this corner of Québec, which has witnessed the blossoming of Arthur Villeneuve, that we meet a gallery owner whose business has been well-established in the city for 35 years.

Chantale Hudon made her start in this highly specialized trade at a very early age, her mother, Pâquerette Hudon, having opened shop at this location in 1976, following painter Albert Rousseau’s recommendation. From then on, her daughter showed marked interest in the art milieu and, overtime, acquired a level of experience and knowledge of the art market that is today inestimable. Chantale Hudon officially took over the management of La Corniche gallery in 1998.

“As gallery owners, we are required to accomplish a great number of tasks and shoulder important costs: insurance, occupation of premises, management of artworks and of the website, reception of visitors, presentation of artists; this is all part of the trade and I have always loved my work. We must also build-up a network of contacts, sit on cultural committees, participate in money-raising drives; in short implicate ourselves fully in our community. All this takes time, but is essential if we wish to ensure some kind of regional success,” states Mrs Hudon. Our host is also a member of the Québec Association of Professional Gallery Owners, a group of art dealers who share a passion, which allows her to communicate with her peers and discuss art market trends in large cities as well as in the regions.

Chantale Hudon reserves a section of her gallery for local and regional creators, those sensitive, creative and talented artists, such as Gilles Jobin, Michel Fedak and others, who spice-up the walls with local flavour. There are also paintings from Léo-Paul Tremblé, a well-renowned Saguenay born artist. The main floor holds a varied collection: paintings from different artists such as Mario Bouchard, Gérard Dansereau, Ann Saint-Gelais, bronzes from Claude Hazanavicius, sculptures from Fedak as well as Inuit art. On the second floor are featured great masters’ paintings: Cosgrove, Marc-Aurèle Fortin, Albert Rousseau, Henri Masson, Marcelle Ferron, Léon Bellefleur, among others. We find ourselves in a veritable museum!

“A majority of people associate visual arts with Charlevoix. But we have in our mists an excellent collection of great Québecois artists. Chicoutimi has in the past been very active in the art world. The city was home to quite a large number of galleries, which in turn attracted some of the most renowned painters and allowed collectors to acquire works of art of the highest quality. But our customer base has changed over the years and even more since the arrival of the Internet which lets you change your mind with the click of a mouse. But, the Web is also beneficial to us, helping us increase our visibility and sales, by facilitating and exponentially widening the access to our bank of artists,” explains Mrs. Hudon. “Long gone is the charming era when women visited the galleries on Main Street on Sundays, dressed in their best garbs, often taking the opportunity to purchase a painting destined to be offered as a wedding gift or other special occasion. Today’s young customer is more impulsive, mostly making spur of the moment’s purchases.”

This enjoyable visit and discussion ends as painter Jobin enters the premises, as well as a young student needing help with a school project. Their turn to be warmly received by the affable gallery owner!


 Text by Robert Lafontaine

Chicoutimi is truly magnificent! Its heritage buildings, its picturesque homes and the majestic Saguenay River, make of it a most enjoyable place to stay…

Suzanne Lavigne

A World of Beauty and Inner Peace

Delight in discovery

Since she started painting, Suzanne Lavigne has been fascinated with the fantastic discoveries the medium constantly provides.

The whole process, for her, is a profound experience where she abandons herself to her creative inspiration. The demands of everyday life simply fade away while her artistic sensitivity takes hold of her being. She becomes a spectator, aware of the nascent canvas taking shape under her eyes. Through her spontaneity of gesture, distinctive of abstracts impressionists, emerges a dialogue between the tools of the trade, the canvas supports and the acrylic pigments. Results often exceed her expectations as the freshly painted canvas reflects her inner spirit and deepest feelings.

Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more

 Text by Helene Caroline Fournier

 

Since she started painting, Suzanne Lavigne has been fascinated with the fantastic discoveries the medium constantly provides…