Galerie Jeannine Blais
Magazin'Art

Colour

QUEBEC CITY

If you like colour and I mean if you really like colour and all the chromatic possibilities it brings to the canvas and the way that it illuminates life, then you need to get yourself to Quebec City in time to see Pierre Bonnard, Radiant Colour at the Quebec National Museum of Fine Art, running from October 6, 2016 to January 15, 2017.

Bonnard, who lived from 1867 to 1947, was a co-founder of the Nabis, a master colourist who worked in oils, engraving and posters. The exhibition is designed to explore his statement: The object is not to paint life but to make painting come alive.

Bonnard was renowned for the originality of his compositions and his extraordinary sense of light. The show consists of roughly 40 paintings, 40 photos, 20 drawings, and prints of interior scenes, nudes, views of Paris and landscapes done in Normandy and the Cote d’Azure.

Fall 2016

If you like colour and I mean if you really like colour and all the chromatic possibilities it brings to the canvas and the way that it illuminates life, then you need to get yourself to Quebec City…

Mireille Molleur, Au gré des feuilles, technique mixte, 36 x 48 po

Mireille and Suzanne Molleur

Tied by Blood, Colour and Heart

Family in Art

During our interview, we readily engaged in a three-way conversation without predefined rules or subjects, akin to the Molleur sisters’ artistic path. In a fairly balanced exchange, which testifies to their long-established adjustment and to the immense affection and respect they hold for one another, I was able to collect their respective vision in a fully equal give and take of confidences. Concerned about the equitable recognition of their respective work, none attempted to overshadow the other, each taking turn to express their mutual points of view on the varied subjects that were brought up.

As members of a family of nine siblings, where art is highly valued, Mireille and Suzanne Molleur develop over the years a strong complicity that extends well beyond their being attracted to the same discipline. This initial complementarity, reinforced with time, later orchestrates their professional visibility through their participation as a duo in various artistic events, exhibiting their works side by side in perfect synergy. Each artist’s work however is unique, entirely independent one from the other, in style as much as in form. “There is no competition between us. We simply enjoy this bubble we have created where we both feel safe, the confluence of our energies also nourishing our respective individual production,” they declare in full agreement.  Abonnez-vous au contenu de notre site internet pour lire ce texte. Subscribe to our Website content to read more


Text by Lisanne LeTellier

Next October, we will find the Moller sisters at the renowned “Rencontre des Arts” in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, as well as on their respective websites. As their exhibits are almost always conjoined, if you find one you will assuredly find the other! And, without cheating, try to guess which is which…

During our interview, we readily engaged in a three-way conversation without predefined rules or subjects…

MONTREAL

As the art world moved from representational to abstract, no small part of the intellectual motivation for this development came from the realization that colour provided a much larger design element than previously thought.

This can be vividly seen in Marvels and Mirages of Orientalism: From Spain to Morocco, Benjamin Constant in his time which runs at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts from January 31, 2015 to May 31, 2015.

Benjamin Constant lived from 1845 to 1902 and was well known and successful in his time. His work was influenced by the Moorish palaces of Spain and Morocco. His ability as a colourist is remarkable and it is to that use of rich colours that I have alluded to above.

Winter 2015

 

As the art world moved from representational to abstract, no small part of the intellectual motivation for this development came from the realization that colour provided a much…

Doug Purdon

likes to pump up his colours

Painting a country 

Doug Purdon likes to paint the sea and landscapes but when it comes right down to it he prefers to paint the sea, partly because of its propensity for atmospherics.

He does the occasional urban landscape and enjoys doing it, but really he prefers the sea, the sky and usually a boat or two or some figures. “I love the water, I love the sea, I love the sky! There is so much colour you can get into them and I love the movement,” says Purdon who usually paints 20-22 paintings a year. “The maritime coasts of Canada, Britain and Scotland are some of my favorite painting places.”

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Text by Noel Meyer

Doug Purdon likes to paint the sea and landscapes but when it comes right down to it he prefers….