Magazin'Art

Art Gallery of Ontario

TORONTO

A new take on Impressionism is taking to the exhibition halls as the Art Gallery of Ontario presents Impressionism in the Age of Industry: Monet Pissarro and More from February 16, 2019 to May 5, 2019.

Developed and mounted by the AGO, the show is the first retrospective to look at the work of some of the world’s greatest Impressionist  and Post-Impressionist painters through the lens of labour and industry. Impressionism is usually associated with leisure activities and this is the first time that the movement is seen as also celebrating the changes that were taking place in Paris as the city went through industrialization and its painters celebrated the dawn of a new era.

The exhibition showcases more than a hundred  works  including  paintings, sculptures, drawings prints, photographs and films from the era. The show begins circa 1870 and ends with the turn of the century. Art work for the exhibition has been sourced f rom around the globe including key works by Monet from the Musee d’Orsay and the Art Institute of Chicago. Works on display include Camille Pissarro’s Pont Boieldieu in Rouen, Damp Weather, Claude Monet’s Charring Cross Bridge, Fog, Edgar Degas’ Woman at her Bath, and James Tissot’s The Shop Girl.

Winter 2019

A new take on Impressionism is taking to…

TORONTO

Going from the sublime to the tragic it may be time, as the world seems in danger of facing a major conflict, to revisit what war actually means and in that case the Art Gallery of Ontario is the place to be as they are hosting a mammoth exhibition, Photography: The First World War-1914-1918. The AGO holds 500 photographic albums depicting the First World War from all sides and because of the amount of material available divided it up in two like this. Part I: April 28 – October 28, 2018. Part II: November 10, 2018 – April 14, 2019.

Adjacent to the main display, the McEwen Gallery will showcase works by Australian war photographer James Francis “Frank” Hurley (1885–1962), who was on official assignment throughout World War I. His album Australian Units on the Western Front (1916–1918) presents a series of compelling photographs, each offering views of different aspects of life on the Front. Soldiers, in action and at ease, are pictured, as well as the grimmer realities of war: casualties, scorched landscapes, and destroyed  architecture.  The  album — disassembled for the exhibition — highlights Hurley’s skill as a photographer and features a rich breadth of imagery.

 

Fall 2018

Going from the sublime to the tragic it may be time…

TORONTO

Drawing is certainly on display this summer. The Art Gallery of Ontario is running Kathe Kollwitz: Art And Life from April 7 to September 30, 2018. Unlike, say the National Gallery’s summer blockbuster, the Kollwitz exhibition is not going to allow you to walk away feeling uplifted. Instead you will probably be depressed because much of the subject matter Kollwitz deals with is tragic.

That being said, you will walk away with a new found appreciation of just how powerful finely executed drawings can be. Kollwitz lived in Berlin from 1867 to 1945 and devoted herself to advocating change by chronicling the lives of the poor and the effects of war. She worked primarily in drawing, woodcuts, etchings, lithographs and sculpture.

While the press release fails to mention how many works will be on display it does note that they will appear in five different museum galleries and that thanks to a donation of 170 Kollwitz pieces the AGO has the largest Kollwitz collection outside of Germany. If you like drawing this is a show for you because they are very powerful works.

 

Summer 2018

Drawing is certainly on display this summer…

Toronto

If you want to see something that you have never before seen and would probably have great difficulty in imagining, you should do what you can to get tickets for Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors, running through at the Art Gallery of Ontario until May 27, 2018.

Kusama is an extraordinary Japanese artist whose work must be seen to be appreciated. Describing it is difficult but here are some adjectives that apply to her work. Bright, colourful, startling and organic. Powerful and absorptive also hold sway. Her paintings are difficult to describe as are her installations, largely because you have never seen anything like them before. Mirror Room, All the Eternal Love I have for the Pumpkins, 2016, can be described as a field of yellow pumpkins with black dots spreading into infinity, but that hardly describes the painting or the effect it has. Her forms are stylized and simplified and her colours are bright and taken together there is an organic quality to them that seems to go on forever. This is a show from a major international artist who at the age of 88 is still industriously working away in her Tokyo studio. See it now and boast about seeing it in the future.

 

Spring 2018

If you want to see something that you have never before seen…

TORONTO

Art lovers rejoice, Georgia O’Keeffe has come to Canada, or at least to Toronto. From April 23rd to July 30th 2017, the Art Gallery of Ontario is setting The world ablaze with Georgia O’Keeffe. It is the first major retrospective of this influential artist to appear in Canada. The show consists of 80 works done over six decades.

While O’Keeffe is mostly known for her florals and skulls, she worked in a variety of styles including abstraction, and painted New York skyscrapers and New Mexico landscapes. She has been recognized as the Mother of American modernism.

As for the flowers, “I hate flowers, I paint them because they’re cheaper than models and they don’t move.” Her abstract flowers are often thought of as being female genitalia but she denied this. This erotic train of thought was encouraged however by the nude and sensuous photographs that her husband Alfred Stieglitz took and exhibited of her.

In 1946 she became the first female artist to have a retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. “Men put me down as the best woman artist… I think I am one of the best painters.” In 2014 her painting “Jimson Weed/White Flower No 1,” painted in 1932 was sold at auction for $44.4 million, and holds the record for the most expensive painting by a female artist sold at auction.

Summer 2017

Art lovers rejoice, Georgia O’Keeffe has come to Canada, or at least to Toronto…

TORONTO

Moving from the dark to the light, the Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, van Gogh and more, running from October 22, 2016 through to January 29, 2017.

The exhibition is made up of work by 36 artists from 15 countries including work by Emily Carr, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Vassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, Georgia O’Keefe and James McNeill Whistler. There are 90 paintings and 20 works on paper. Some of the pictures on display include van Gogh’s The Starry Night over the Rhone at Arles, Gauguin’s Vision after the Sermon and Monet’s Water Lilies.

Winter 2017

Moving from the dark to the light, the Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, van Gogh and more, running from October 22…

TORONTO

Moving from the dark to the light, the Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, Van Gogh and more, running from October 22, 2016 through to January 29, 2017.

The exhibition is made up of work by 36 artists from 15 countries including work by Emily Carr, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, Vassily Kandinsky, Piet Mondrian, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, Georgia O’Keefe and James McNeill Whistler. There are 90 paintings and 20 works on paper. Some of the pictures on display include Van Gogh’s The Starry Night over the Rhone at Arles, Gauguin’s Vision after the Sermon and Monet’s Water Lilies.

Fall 2016

Moving from the dark to the light, the Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Mystical Landscapes: Masterpieces from Monet, van Gogh and more, running from October 22, 2016 through…

WINNIPEG

Karel Funk, from June 11 through to October 2, 2016 at the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

The gallery is presenting the work of hometown artist Karel Funk, a Canadian artist who stands poised to breakout into international art scene stardom. Although some aspects of his work appear to carry forward Alex Colville’s mantel Funk is a hyperrealist mining a very Canadian vein.

Funk’s recent work focuses on single isolated figures wearing high performance outerwear against a white backdrop. Over the years the figures themselves have slowly disappeared. Funk’s work is held in major institutions including the National Gallery of CanadaWhitney Museum of American Art, Art Gallery of Ontario, Solomon R. Guggenheim and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Summer 2016

Karel Funk, June 11- October 2, 2016 at the Winnipeg Art Gallery…

TORONTO

From July 1, through to September 18, 2016 the Art Gallery of Ontario will be mounting The Idea of North: The Paintings of Lawren Harris. This is the exhibition that you have been hearing about on and off for about a year. Yes, it is the one curated by funny man and musician Steve Martin. The exhibition has already been seen in Los Angeles and Boston. It is the first solo Harris exhibition  seen  in  the  United  States. The has been beefed for its Toronto incarnation to include some of his early work which features cityscapes and an epilogue that purports to explore the influence of Harris’ landscapes on Canadian identity. There are some 80 works on display.

While you are at the AGO you might want to wander over to Backdrop, Hurvin Anderson’s first major exhibition in Canada. Anderson is English and his family comes from Jamaica. One of Anderson’s interesting conceits is to paint landscape which is blocked off to the viewer because it is behind a metal trellis, fence or gate. Another point of interest is that most of his work is very large and once past the security elements lush. Backdrop runs through to August 21, 2016.

Summer 2016

From July 1, through to September 18, 2016 the Art Gallery of Ontario will be mounting…

TORONTO

If you are going to be in Toronto this holiday season, don’t walk, run to the Art Gallery of Ontario and see the J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free , before it ends on January 31st . This is probably the only chance you will have of seeing these painting by one of the great artists of all time and of whom it could be said helped set the stage for Impressionism and modern art. Fifty works from the most experimental and influential stage of Turner’s career are on display.

WINTER 2016

If you are going to be in Toronto this holiday season, don’t walk, run to the Art Gallery of Ontario and see the J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free , before it ends on January 31st…

TORONTO

It may now be time for something a little more modern and the Art Gallery of Ontario will be showing Jean-Michel Basquiat: Now’s the Time until May 10, 2015. Basquiat made a reputation for himself in New York City during the late 1980s and that reputation soon became international. Basquiat was black and his art confronted racism, identity and social tension. This is the first retrospective of Basquiat’s work to be shown in Canada and consists of close to 85 large scale paintings and drawings from private collections and public museums across Europe and North America.

Spring 2015

It may now be time for something a little more modern and the Art Gallery of Ontario will be showing Jean-Michel Basquiat…

TORONTO

The Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective from December 20, 2014 to March 15, 2015. Spiegelman is best known for Maus for which he won a Pulitzer Award. Maus is a two volume graphic novel which details how his parents survived in Nazi concentration camps. In Maus, the Jews are drawn as mice.

Other themes that spring to mind when discussing the creative cartoonist who as you might guess is one of the best draughtsmen working today include the hard-boiled detective genre, politics and Cubism. The exhibition consists of more than 300 works on paper ranging from trading cards to magazine covers.

Winter 2015

The Art Gallery of Ontario is presenting Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective from December 20, 2014 to March 15, 2015. Spiegelman is best known for Maus for which he won a…

TORONTO

Even though the Globe and Mail has come out and said that the Alex Colville show is just simply too large, (isn’t that like saying there’s too much ice cream in the world?) I still think everyone should go to Alex Colville August 23-January 4, 2015 at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

Colville was well known for being his own man and that manifested itself in his style which could be described as magic realism in which there is always the sense that some kind of uneasy question is lurking around the corner. Something disquieting is about to happen that will forever change the person who witnesses it. This sense of impending doom may very well have been the result of his service as a war artist during the Second World War.

Colville was a remarkable artist and famed for his abilities as a draftsman. He had an international reputation and in Canada some of his images have become iconic as maple syrup. The exhibition is made up of more than 100 works and includes the following pictures: Horse and Train , To Prince Edward Island , Woman in Bathtub and Target, Pistol and Man .

Autumn 2014

Even though the Globe and Mail has come out and said that the Alex Colville show is just simply too large, (isn’t that like saying there’s too much ice cream in the world?) …

TORONTO

In Toronto the Art Gallery of Ontario is mounting Francis Bacon and Henry Moore which consists of over 60 works by the two major British artists. The show runs from april 5 to July 20, 2014. Each piece of Moore’s sculpture is matched with a painting by Bacon to explore the two’s joint obsession with form.

Spring 2014

In Toronto the Art Gallery of Ontario is mounting Francis Bacon and Henry Moore which consists of over 60…

TORONTO

They’ve gone hog wild in Hogtown over Alex Colville and so they should. Colville died last July and now the Art Gallery of Ontario is mounting the largest exhibition of the artist’s work to date in his honour. Alex Colville August 23-July 4, 2015. Colville was well known for being his own man and that manifested itself in his style which could be described as magic realism in which there is always the sense that some kind of uneasy question is lurking around the corner. Something disquieting is about to happen that will forever change the person who witnesses it. This sense of impending doom may very well have been the result of his service as a war artist during the Second World War.

Colville was a remarkable artist and famed for his abilities as a draftsman. He had an international reputation and in Canada some of his images have become iconic as maple syrup. The exhibition is made up of more than 100 works and includes the following pictures: Horse and Train, To Prince Edward Island, Woman in Bathtub and Target, Pistol and Man.

Summer 2014

They’ve gone hog wild in Hogtown over Alex Colville and so they should. Colville died last July and now the Art Gallery of Ontario is mounting the largest exhibition…

TORONTO

I don’t know whether to take this seriously or not because it falls into what I call the questionable category of sociology as art, but the Art Gallery of Ontario is mounting the touring exhibition David Bowie is, from September 25, through to November 27, 2013.

The show which consists of more than 300 items is on loan from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London where it enjoyed a record breaking run. The items on exhibit include 50 stage costumes, lyrics, music videos, short films and album art among other objects. The New York Times described the show as, “united in sound and vision in a way that is rarely seen in a museum.”

It also includes clips from movies in which Bowie has acted. Bowie started out as an art student before he became a rock star and was in the business of constantly reinventing himself. Along the way he experimented with Surrealism, German Expressionism, Music Hall, mime and Japanese Kabuki performance.

It promises to be a full blown multimedia experience. If you are still in doubt as to who Bowie is think of Canada’s most famous astronaut Chris Hadfield when he sang, “Ground control to Major Tom,” that was Space Oddity, a David Bowie song which still receives regular airplay.

For those of you who aren’t really interested in shape-shifting rock stars, the AGO is also presenting The Great Upheaval: Modern Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, from November 30, 2013 to March 2, 2014.

This exhibition focuses on the incredible amount of creativity that flowered in Europe during the years leading up to and through to the end of the First World War. This was the time in which Expressionism, Futurism, Dada and Cubism took hold and flourished and paved the way for that even greater upheaval, Abstraction. The exhibition includes work by Brancusi, Cezanne, Chagall, Duchamp, Kandinsky, Leger, Matisse, Modigliani, Mondrian and Picasso.

Autumn 2013

I don’t know whether to take this seriously or not because it falls into what I call the questionable category of…

TORONTO

Until June 2014, the Art Gallery of Ontario is running Kenojuak Ashevak: In Memoriam. Ashevak was born in 1927 in an igloo on Baffin Island and died in early January 2013 at home on Cape Dorset at the age of 85, and with her passed an era. She was probably one of the last people alive to have been persuaded by James Houston to abandon traditional crafts to making prints. Houston was the man who put Inuit art on the map, an artist himself, he was painting in the north when he started swapping his work for theirs. The sculpture he brought south with him was impressive enough for the government to send him back up to teach the Inuit how to make prints and so art began to blossom in the north as a way to replace income lost from the fading fur trade.

Editor and publisher Douglas Gibson who knew both Ashevak and Houston described Ashevak as Houston’s star pupil.

She was almost the face of Inuit art for a time. Her print, The Enchanted Owl, 1960, became a Canada Post stamp in 1970, the same year she travelled to the World’s Fair in Osaka. In 1967 she was made a member of the Order of Canada and in 1982 she was made a Companion of the Order of Canada. The Osaka World’s Fair provided her with an international reputation.

Winter 2014

Until June 2014, the Art Gallery of Ontario is running Kenojuak Ashevak: In Memoriam…