Magazin'Art

tapestries

NEW YORK

As you would expect the Metropolitain Museum in New York has some marvelous galleries that always repay a visit. I suggest that for the holidays a visit to the tapestries at the Metropolitain are in order. After all, what’s a snowfall without a few tapestries to look at? At the risk of mangling my metaphors or mixing my seasons, Fabergé Easter Eggs also seem to enjoy being seen against the background of winter.

Fabergé from the Matilda Geddings Gray Foundation Collection  is on display at the Met until November 27, 2016 . As you would suspect with the Met, the most important Fabergé piece in the United States is on display as well, the Lillies-of-the-Valley Basket  as are three Imperial Easter Eggs. Pieces of the collection will rotate on display for the next five years.

If you arrive in New York before January 6, 2016  you will have a chance to see the Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche . The tree itself is a 20 foot blue spruce decorated with 55, 18th Century Neapolitan angels and 22 cherubs hovering among its boughs and groups of 69 realistic crèche figures flanking the Nativity scene. All of this is set against a Spanish choir screen from the Valladolid Cathedral.

Winter 2016

As you would expect the Metropolitain Museum in New York has some marvelous galleries that always repay a visit. I suggest that for the holidays a visit to the tapestries…

WINNIPEG

There are a couple of interesting things going on at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. There first you might call a bit of a retrospective and the second you might call a bit of a miracle. L.L. FitzGerald’s Impressionist Decade, 1910-1920, running until June 7, 2015, examines some luminescent work by the Manitoba artist Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald. FitzGerald’s work in trying to honestly record the effect of light and atmosphere have resulted in some wonderful works that deserve to be appreciated to a greater extent than they are.

And now, here’s the miracle: Elisapee Ishulutaq Yesterday and Today, running until June 14, 2015. The work consists of one large mural done in oil stick on paper. It shows the dif ferences between when Ishulutaq was young and the world around her in Pangnirtung now.

The miracle part of it all is that the work was commissioned by Darlene Coward Wight, Curator of Inuit Art, Winnipeg Art Gallery, when Elisapee was 90 years old in 2014.

Wight had been aware of Elisapee for some time and so she should have. Elisapee Ishulutaq is one of the last if not the last original artist from the Pangnirtung experimental print shop in 1970. Her work is famous and has been used as the basis for tapestries. She is also a member of the Order of Canada.

The charming part of all of this is that if you want more insight into the creation of art you can watch it being done in a seven minute video that is completely both charming and fascinating. You can see the video on the Winnipeg Art Gallery website in the current exhibition section or look Elisapee Ishulutaq up on YouTube.

Spring 2015

There are a couple of interesting things going on at the Winnipeg Art Gallery. There first you might call a bit of a retrospective and the second…