Magazin'Art

London

Claude Picher (1927-1998)

Like a Rough Diamond from the Depths

Great Encounter

” I see the practice of art as a veritable incarnation of life, an excess, a folly, an infinity, a freedom, something organic that can take us much further than all sorts of travels .” Clémentine Célarié

An artist of such stature as Claude Picher cannot be invented. The painter’s successful career began while he was still in his teens. Appreciated by collectors across Canada as much as Jean Paul Lemieux, he quickly gained national notoriety. Voluntary, spontaneous and impulsive in character, he was also known for his political involvement and his acerbic critics towards the established systems that framed the field of visual arts. A look back at an artistic giant that has today almost been forgotten, but is still extremely topical!

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Text by Michel Bois

Claude Picher is represented by:

Galerie Douce Passion, 42 Notre-Dame St., in Québec

Galerie Perreault, 205 Saint-Paul St., in Québec

The writing team thanks these two galleries for the images provided

to illustrate this article.

 

 

An artist of such stature as Claude Picher cannot be invented. The painter’s successful career began while he was still in his teens. Appreciated by collectors across Canada as much as…

LONDON

Moving on from looking at the past to inspiring the future The Tate Modern in London is showing Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs from April 17-September 7, 2014. When you look at the cut outs one of the questions you end up walking away with is whether or not there would have been a Pop Art explosion in the 1960‘s without the influence of Matisse’s work. Matisse worked on the cut-outs in his old age starting when he was 71, recovering from radical colon surgery and confined to either a wheelchair or bed. He couldn’t work at an easel but he could shape form and colour by using scissors, coloured paper and pins to attach them to the wall. Eventually Matisse would have an assistant pin the pieces of a work against the wall and finally they would be taken down and framed in glass. Matisse worked for the last 13 years of life on the cut-outs. There are 130 cut-outs in the show and some of them are very large.

Summer 2014

Moving on from looking at the past to inspiring the future The Tate Modern in London is showing Henri Matisse: The Cut- Outs…